Ronan Tynan is truly a modern day “Renaissance Man.” Faced with numerous challenges throughout his well-documented life, he has persevered with enormous passion and determination. He attributes his success to his faith and the knowledge that the Man Above guides him through every door he opens. Introduced to international audiences as a member of the Irish Tenors, Tynan quickly became known for his unique voice and irresistible appeal. Following his mother’s advice to always follow your dreams, Tynan decided to launch a solo career, and has achieved the fame and adoration that could have existed only in the farthest reaches of his dreams.

Ronan Tynan’s singing offered the gentlest consolation at the funeral of President Ronal...

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Building a Capacity for Resilience 
Rome wasn’t built in a day. Neither was the Great Pyramid of Giza nor our capacity to withstand hardships and recover from the harshest of losses.  Resiliency is not something that people are born with, but anyone with the proper tools can build the capacity for it.  Ronan Tynan takes the audience on a journey in his newest acclaimed keynote speech drawing on his experiences of resiliency including bouncing back from his bilateral amputation when he was 21.  With his trademark humor and amazing voice, Tynan will have audiences standing and cheering as he teaches them how they can persevere through life’s toughest challenges and keep taking risks.

Hitting the High Notes: Living Life to the Fullest
This is truly an inspirational program – with storytelling, humor and songs about capitalizing on opportunities, overcoming obstacles and making the most out of life.

Profiled by ABC’s 20/20, People Magazine and PBS Sunday Morning, Physician, Recording Artist and Paralympic athlete Ronan Tynan moves people like few others can.  His personal story of triumph and his impassioned singing captivates and inspires audiences nationwide.  A natural born storyteller and gifted with humor, Ronan’s ability to easily connect with audiences along with his inspiring message about overcoming obstacles and living life to the fullest promotes ways to reach new heights both professionally and personally.

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  • Singer Ronan Tynan: Overcoming obstacles to bring inspiration
    Singer Ronan Tynan: Overcoming obstacles to bring inspiration
    Feb 27, 2018
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    Singer Ronan Tynan: Overcoming obstacles to bring inspiration
    Feb 27, 2018
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    It’s been tested many times throughout Ronan Tynan’s 20-plus-year career, but it’s his faith that the singer attributes his longevity and success to.

    On Monday afternoon Tynan had a few minutes to spare before teaching a class at Boston College. He’ll be heading to Vermont next week for a performance at the Paramount Theatre in Rutland at 8 p.m. Friday, March 2.

    The first test occurred right out of the gate, at birth. Tynan was born with phocomelia, a condition that involves malformation of the arms and legs. At age 20 his legs were amputated below the knee after a car accident, but within weeks he was climbing stairs on artificial legs. He went on to represent Ireland in the 1984 and 1988 Summer Paralympics, winning a total of four golds, two silvers, and one bronze medal.

    At the suggestion of his father, Tynan began studying voice, and he won a series of awards before he came to international attention when he joined the Irish Tenors, a singing trio from Ireland that started in the late 1990s.

    In his solo career Tynan became known for his famous rendition of “God Bless America,” which he sang for many years at Yankee Stadium during the seventh-inning stretch. After 9/11, it became an anthem of patriotism. But another test of faith came when he parted ways with the Yankees. He relocated from New York to Massachusetts, and his career has forged ahead.

    “I think the biggest thing about music,” Tynan said, “is if you have passion about what you do, you look forward to doing it because it’s not a chore. It’s not a struggle. It’s something you look forward to and it gives you a lot of joy and happiness, and you hope to give that to others.”

    None of this can convey the pathos in his voice when, for instance, he sings Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” Or the irrepressible hope in his version of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” Some of his notable appearances have been at the Archbishop’s installation Mass in St. Patrick’s Cathedral, when he was invited by New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan; and a performance at the funeral of President Ronald Regan, at which Tynan sang “Amazing Grace” and Schubert’s “Ave Maria.”

    Today, “I do a combination of a lot of different things,” Tynan said. “My pianist Bill Lewis and I do maybe 30 shows a year. I do about 30 motivational speaking (appearances), and I do symphonies and orchestras and the Irish Tenors.”

    Tynan’s inspiration to continue to juggle a busy career and take the lows with the highs comes from one place, “the Man above.”

    “My faith is strong,” Tynan said. “I was blessed with great parents who instilled in me a positive outlook in life, and I believe every day is to be embraced as if it’s the first and greatest day of your life. When you do that, you look forward to it.”
     
    Paramount Theatre

    The Paramount Theatre presents “An Evening with Ronan Tynan” at 8 p.m. Friday, March 2, at 30 Center St. in Rutland. Tickets are $34-$39; call 802-775-0903, or go online to www.paramountvt.org.

  • Embrace Every Opportunity: Renaissance Man Ronan Tynan Takes Colonial Stage
    Embrace Every Opportunity: Renaissance Man Ronan Tynan Takes Colonial Stage
    Dec 19, 2017
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    Ronan Tynan's multiple successes aren't a result of merely the luck o' the Irish – his life has been one of hard work, pure determination and faith.

    Tynan, one-third of The Irish Tenors and solo artist, will perform a holiday concert of traditional carols and classic Irish ballads accompanied by long-time pianist Bill Lewis this Saturday, Dec. 16, at Keene's Colonial Theatre.

    The Boston resident who grew up in Johnstown, County Kilkenny, Ireland knows a lot about life challenges and just as much about how to overcome them. Born with a lower limb disability, Tynan didn't let it prevent him from riding horses and racing motorcycles. At 20 years old, his legs had to be amputated below the knee after an auto accident caused serious complications.

    Again, it didn't keep him down. Within a year, he was winning gold medals in the Paralympics –18 to be exact between 1981 and 1984. He still holds nine of 14 world records.

    He credits his parents for instilling his unwavering ambition.

    "My parents instilled a philosophy in me to go for everything, to embrace every opportunity," said Tynan in a recent interview with ELF.

    That philosophy led him to pursue a medical degree. Tynan became the first disabled person ever admitted to the National College of Physical Education. He later became a full-fledged medical doctor, specializing in orthopedic sports injuries, with a degree from Trinity College.

    Tynan didn't stop there. He became a motivational speaker – today he presents 50 speeches a year for major international corporations and organizations.

    Then there's his music career, which he didn't launch until he was 33, when he was well into his residency as a physician. Though he enjoyed singing as a boy, he had never considered formal voice study until then. Five years later, he joined friend Anthony Kearns and Finbar Wright to form the trio, The Irish Tenors.

    "There's a comradery when you’re part of a group, especially one who's worked together 20 years," said Tynan. "We live with each other; we bear each other's company. Most groups are gone after five years. We have a proven recipe that works. We perform wonderful music with orchestras. We give old material a new life. The standard never falls. We love what we do. We have a core group following who loves the Irish culture and loves Irish music."

    Tynan left the group in 2005 (but returned in 2011) to pursue a solo career, another dream of his. He released his self-titled debut album that year which reached the #2 spot on Billboard’s Classical Crossover Chart, just behind Josh Groban. Working as a solo artist gives him the freedom to diversify his repertoire.

    "I select music, I go across styles from to contemporary to classic to Irish to country," he said. "I also love rock. I take the songs I enjoy from the Beatles and Eric Clapton and put my own slant on them. It allows you the privilege to do all that."
    His solo career has also allowed him to achieve his own successes in the world of music. His resumé is beyond impressive, having performed at many prestigious venues: Carnegie Hall, the National Mall and the Vatican (for two Popes) among them. He sang at the funerals of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Sen. Edward Kennedy; in his hometown after the Boston Marathon bombing; and performed "God Bless America" at Yankee Stadium.

    For all of this, he's been called a modern Renaissance man, a name he embraces.

    "The most important ingredient is a solid foundation that can only be gotten with God," said Tynan. "My parents never blocked any opportunity and I ran with that. The most important thing for a parent to give a child is belief and shower them with it."

  • KET to Air 25th Anniversary Performance of UK Opera’s 'Grand Night'
    KET to Air 25th Anniversary Performance of UK Opera’s 'Grand Night'
    Dec 15, 2017
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    KET to Air 25th Anniversary Performance of UK Opera’s 'Grand Night'
    Dec 15, 2017
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    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2017) —  Last June, KET (Kentucky Educational Television) cameras captured the magic and music of the 25th anniversary production of “It’s a Grand Night for Singing!,” the beloved annual summer musical revue of University of Kentucky Opera Theatre. For those who missed the program or those who just want to relive it, KET will broadcast “A Grand Night for Singing” 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15, on KET, and 9 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17, on KET2.

    Recorded live at the Singletary Center for the Arts, the anniversary program contains many favorite numbers from past productions, including “Lullaby of Broadway,” as well as more recent hits, including songs from the Broadway musical phenomenon “Hamilton.”

    In a special, guest appearance, Ronan Tynan — of The Irish Tenors fame — performs “Impossible Dream” from “Man of La Mancha.” Other highlights include hits from Broadway mainstays such as “Hairspray,” “West Side Story,” “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Les Misérables” and “Rent.”

    Along with Tynan, featured soloists include UK Opera Theatre Director Everett McCorvey as well as current and former students of the UK Opera Theatre program, including renowned tenor and UK alumnus Gregory Turay.

    KET’s production of “A Grand Night for Singing” was produced by Nick Helton.

    For those outside the KET viewing area, the station will also livestream the Dec. 15 broadcast on www.KET.org/live at 9 p.m. In addition, KET will broadcast the program multiple times this December and January on its stations. For a listing of all viewing times, visit: www.ket.org/series/KGRNS/.

    UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The School of Music has gained national recognition for high caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, music therapy, composition, and theory and music history.

  • Inspirational Irish singing star brings his message to Greenville
    Inspirational Irish singing star brings his message to Greenville
    Oct 10, 2017
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    Inspirational Irish singing star brings his message to Greenville
    Oct 10, 2017
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    Ronan Tynan, the internationally renowned Irish tenor who will deliver the keynote address at Thursday’s Eastern Carolina Vocational Center annual banquet, quickly deflects any credit he is given for easing the grief of millions after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But his inspirational life clearly qualifies him for the title of “healer.” 

    Tynan, 57, is perhaps most well known in the U.S. for the gently consoling and inspirational voice he brought to New Yorkers and all Americans in the wake of the 9/11 tragedy, and again in 2004 at the funeral of President Ronald Reagan, viewed by more than 35 million people worldwide. He also is famous here for his performances of “God Bless America” at Yankee Stadium during the seventh-inning stretch, which, he says on his website, have been nothing short of unforgettable.

    His experiences facing and overcoming many personal challenges reflect in Tynan’s musical expression and closely connect him to his audiences, he said.

    “I think what’s most important is to be attuned to yourself, because you are sharing the talent that the Lord gave you,” he told The Daily Reflector in a phone conversation. “I don’t really think that people turn to me for solace, but if you’re honest with yourself, it transfers to the audience and ... allows them the opportunity to reflect on their own feelings and the people they love.”

    To put it another way, Tynan can relate.He was born in Dublin with a deforming lower limb disability that threatened to sideline him throughout his childhood. Undaunted in his youth, he rode horses and raced motorcycles, according to his website biograpy. When he was 20, his legs had to be amputated below the knee after an auto accident caused serious complications. Within a year, he was winning gold medals in the Paralympics. Between 1981 and 1984, Tynan amassed eighteen gold medals and 14 world records. Nine of his records still stand.

    The determination instilled in him by his parents soon propelled Tynan to conquer a whole new field. He became the first disabled person ever admitted to the National College of Physical Education in Limerick, Ireland. He later became a medical doctor, specializing in orthopedic sports injuries.

    Though he enjoyed singing as a boy, Tynan did not seriously consider formal voice study until he was 33 and well into his residency as a physician. He retired from private practice in 2016, but still teaches at two universities. He devotes his free time to his family, recording and motivational speaking around the world, including this week at ECVC.

    “I love the philosophy of Eastern Carolina Vocational Center,” Tynan said. “People who have challenges have to be of a disposition that they have all the capacity to do what’s possible. This is not an easy world we live in. You have to instill the belief that the ability is there and you have to work to develop it.”

    Tynan has relied a great deal throughout his life on his spiritual strength and religious faith to propel him forward from his disabilities.

    “People with disabilities have to use the talents that the man above gives them to project themselves forward,” he said. “Nothing is ever straightforward and no life is similar, but if you approach yours with a sense of enjoyment, it makes it very different.” 

    ECVC is a private nonprofit corporation that provides job training and employment services to persons with disabilities in Pitt and its surrounding counties. It funds its mission while providing meaningful employment through many lines of business, including frame manufacturing, battery terminal manufacturing and the packaging and distribution of batteries and office products. It also provides commingled recyclable sorting services and local janitorial services, managing two locations at the Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station.

    Tynan also has drawn much of his inspiration and determination from his close relationship with his parents, a diminutive couple with gigantic ambitions for their son.

    “Parents play a huge role in any child with a disability because they have to give encouragement and belief that their child has the ability to go forward,” he said. “Sometimes this requires tough love. While it sometimes is a difficult adjective to use, ‘tough’ love gives children the confidence to go forward. That and a sense of endearment are qualities that parents instill.”

    Even success poses challenges for Tynan, including the time he must spend away from family and loved ones in Ireland to pursue his solo singing and speaking career. He applies his simple philosophy to manage those as well.

    “It’s life; you accept what you’re given,” he said.

  • ECVC celebrating 52nd anniversary with inclusion banquet
    ECVC celebrating 52nd anniversary with inclusion banquet
    Oct 03, 2017
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    ECVC celebrating 52nd anniversary with inclusion banquet
    Oct 03, 2017
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    GREENVILLE,NC (WITN) - October marks National Disability Employment Awareness Month, and the Eastern Carolina Vocational Center (ECVC) is celebrating inclusion with its 52nd anniversary banquet.

    ECVC’s mission is to help persons with disabilities attain a higher quality of life through the achievement of their vocational goals.

    The banquet will be on October 12 at 6:30pm at the Rock Springs Center. You can make reservations until October 6.

    Every year, the banquet features a successful person with a disability as a role model to inspire people with disabilities.

    This year's special guest speaker is Dr. Ronan Tynan, who organizers describe as 'a modern day “Renaissance man.”'

    'Born with lower limb disability that threatened to sideline him throughout his childhood, Tynan was still “as wild as a March hare” when he was a growing boy, riding horses and racing motorcycles. When he was twenty, his legs had to be amputated below the knee after an auto accident caused serious complications. Just weeks after the operation, he was climbing up the steps of his college dorm, and within a year, he was winning gold medals in the Paralympics as a multi-talented athlete. His ability to simultaneously console and inspire with his singing is well known. Just a few of his performances are as follows: “Amazing Grace and Ave Maria” at President Ronald Reagan’s funeral at the personal invitation of Nancy Reagan; “God Bless America” at the Yankee Stadium; In the wake of 9/11, benefits and memorial services for New York's’ Finest and Bravest.'

  • It helps if others believe in you
    It helps if others believe in you
    Jun 27, 2017
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    It helps if others believe in you
    Jun 27, 2017
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    Royal Gazette article by Paul Loftus

    The expectations of others can be a powerful force in driving success, according Ronan Tynan, a Paralympic multiple gold medalist, medical doctor, tenor and motivational speaker.

    In a presentation at the Association for Talent Development conference in Atlanta, Mr. Tynan delivered an inspirational message that told the story of how he overcame sizeable hurdles to find success in many parts of life.

    He grew up on a farm in County Kilkenny in Ireland. He was born with a lower-limb disability and subsequently suffered complications in a car accident which resulted in his legs being amputated when his was 20. He made a rapid recovery and between 1981 and 1984 he won 18 gold medals and broke 14 world records.

    Mr. Tynan always wanted to be a doctor and was accepted to medical school at Trinity College, Dublin from where he graduated. He specialised in orthopaedic sports injuries.

    He subsequently began voice training and entered the BBC’s singing competition Go for It. He won the competition and was selected to be a member of the Irish Tenors. He now lives in Boston.

    Right from the start of his presentation, he emphasised the power of expectations of others in his success. This was music to my ears as I’m a very strong proponent of the Pygmalion Effect or the Self-fulfilling Prophecy.

    I’ve written an article on the topic which has appeared in a number of international business magazines including the Canadian Banker. The theory states that if others have high, but realistic, expectations of us we in turn have a tendency to live up to those expectations. These expectations are communicated to us both verbally and non verbally.

    The idea comes from Greek mythology. Pygmalion was a prince of Cyprus who wanted the ideal woman so he carved a statue out of ivory and called his creation Galatea. So perfect was his statue that he fell in love with it. Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love, saw his desperation and gave life to it. This story was the basis for George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion.

    Ronan talked about the “belief of others in me”, particularly his immediate family. From his sister Fiona, who he said was “my shield and support”, to his mother and father, the belief was there.

    He spoke with such passion about overcoming his handicaps that there were many tears in the captivated audience. He said “we all need someone”. His father would say: “Ronan, you’re great.”

    He was convinced by his father that he was a winner and a winner he became in so many areas of his life.

    “My father always reckoned I was a winner,” he said. He is convinced that mentoring does make a big difference in a person’s success. Parents, teachers and bosses have a profound effect on the self confidence, behaviour and success of their children, students and direct reports.

    He said: “You see in yourself what others see in you, a strength waiting to be harnessed.”

    A strong belief by others in you leads to increased self-confidence and these self-expectations are known as the Galatea Effect.

    “That’s all we need to do today, build on strengths,” because “there’s no reverse gear in life — you have to go forward”, and “we can be recognised for the extraordinary, that’s what makes us great” is the type of advice Ronan provided to his audience. By building on success you can achieve more success, i.e. build on strengths.

    Of those keynote speakers who give a press briefing most do so after their speech. However, Mr. Tynan provided his before his presentation. I found a natural rapport with him as a fellow Irishman and we started our conversation discussing Gaelic football and hurling.

    Ronan gave us a lot of family background which would help us understand his presentation even better. His father was only 5ft 4in tall and his mother was only slightly taller. His father referred to his mother as “top management or she who must be obeyed, which my Irish colleague here [me] will perfectly understand. Irish mothers are powerful directed people. The reason I stand in front of anybody today is because of her.”

    As one of seven children I can certainly agree with Ronan as my mother ran a dry cleaning business while raising the seven of us. My Dad was a livestock dealer and it was unusual in those times to have a dual-career family.

    Ronan went on to say that “people who believe in you and encourage you give you the motivation to be the best you can be”. For a boy with physical challenges parental love was extremely important and Mr Tynan received this in abundance.

    Mr. Tynan believes that the biggest risk in life is not taking risk because life is driven from within you.

    My favourite quote from his presentation is: “A smile is the cheapest drug on the market and there are no side effects.”

    He finished his presentation as he started it, with a song.

    I, like the several thousand other people who heard his speech left in awe. For someone with such physical handicaps to become so successful in so many areas in life is an inspiration to all of us.

    If you ever get a chance and want to be inspired, go listen to him.

  • Business Wire: Majesco Announces Ronan Tynan as Closing Keynote Speaker at Convergence 2017
    Business Wire: Majesco Announces Ronan Tynan as Closing Keynote Speaker at Convergence 2017
    Apr 19, 2017
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    Business Wire: Majesco Announces Ronan Tynan as Closing Keynote Speaker at Convergence 2017
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    Majesco Announces Ronan Tynan as Closing Keynote Speaker at Convergence 2017

    Irish tenor, recording artist, physician, and champion disabled athlete Ronan Tynan to speak at Majesco’s 10th annual conference
    April 19, 2017

    MORRISTOWN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Majesco (NYSE MKT: MJCO), a global provider of core insurance software and consulting services for insurance business transformation, today announced that Ronan Tynan will be the closing keynote speaker, providing an inspirational perspective on taking challenges on to achieve success at their upcoming customer conference Convergence 2017 beginning October 1, 2017 through October 3, 2017 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

    Ronan Tynan is an Irish tenor, recording artist, physician, and champion disabled athlete. Tynan moves audiences like few others can. He has performed at historic events including Ronald Reagan’s funeral and the inaugural prayer service at the National Cathedral. His memorable renditions of “God Bless America” have been heard at the World Series, The Belmont Stakes, and other momentous events. His stirring performances and personal story of triumph have brought him international fame. The New York Times called him “the closest thing this country has to an official meistersinger.”

    “We are absolutely delighted that Ronan will be the keynote speaker at Convergence 2017,” said Ed Ossie, COO for Majesco. “Ronan has been an inspiration to me and thousands of others across the world. His fresh perspective on tackling challenges, persevering and succeeding will enlighten and encourage all of us to see our own situations through a little different lens."

    Now in its 10th year, Convergence is Majesco’s annual customer conference where many of the 150 customers, both business and IT, industry analysts, and partners come together to share and discuss industry trends, innovation, InsurTech, best practices, customer case studies, Majesco business and product updates and networking for both P&C, L&A and Group lines of business. The conference features a solution galaxy highlighting Majesco Solutions, new innovations, and selected partner solutions, including InsurTech start-ups Business and IT leaders from customers, analysts, partners and prospects considering Majesco solutions are expected to attend the event in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  • RONAN TYNAN Returns to The Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts
    RONAN TYNAN Returns to The Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts
    Apr 03, 2017
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    RONAN TYNAN Returns to The Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts
    Apr 03, 2017
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    Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts (PTPA) was honored to welcome back acclaimed Irish tenor, Ronan Tynan, in "An Evening with Ronan Tynan" on Saturday, April 1 at 8 p.m. BroadwayWorld was on hand to capture the one night only engagement. Click here to see photos from the event!

    Ronan Tynan moves people like few others can. His personal story of triumph and his impassioned singing captivates and inspires audiences nationwide. Called the "burly tenor with a big, silvery voice" by Variety, Tynan accompanied by his long time pianist Bill Lewis, will bring a repertoire that is diverse as it is entertaining: a mix of Irish favorites, selections from the great American songbook, contemporary, as well as newly written material. The New York Times recognizes Tynan's "unornamented singing as distinct relief, who lets the lines of familiar melodies soar without fancy embellishment."

    Introduced to American audiences in 1999 as a member of The Irish Tenors, Tynan continues to perform throughout the United States and record new material as a solo artist. In addition, he is currently the Alltech Visiting Artist in Residence at the University of Kentucky's Opera Theatre program teaching Vocal Performance and Voice and Repertoire classes with a focus in oratorio and opera at the undergraduate and graduate level.

    For more information on exclusive speaker Ronan Tynan, contact Executive Speakers Bureau at (901) 754-9404.

  • Astronauts Mark and Scott Kelly, Kelly McGonigal, and Ronan Tynan to Keynote ATD 2017 International Conference & Exposition
    Astronauts Mark and Scott Kelly, Kelly McGonigal, and Ronan Tynan to Keynote ATD 2017 International Conference & Exposition
    Mar 24, 2017
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    Astronauts Mark and Scott Kelly, Kelly McGonigal, and Ronan Tynan to Keynote ATD 2017 International Conference & Exposition
    Mar 24, 2017
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    Astronauts Mark and Scott Kelly, Kelly McGonigal, and Ronan Tynan to Keynote ATD 2017 International Conference & Exposition

    Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) March 23, 2017

    The Association for Talent Development (ATD) will hold its 2017 International Conference & Exposition on May 21-24, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia. The conference is the premier international event for trainers and everyone working in the talent development profession.

    ATD 2017 is anchored by three general sessions featuring Mark and Scott Kelly, NASA astronauts and retired U.S. Navy Captains, Dr. Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University, and Dr. Ronan Tynan, who, as an Irish Tenor, Paralympic Champion, and M.D., has been described as a modern-day Renaissance-man. These three dynamic speakers will share their stories and perspectives on leadership, conquering stress, and living life to the fullest.

    Learning opportunities at this conference are abundant. There are more than 300 networking and education sessions content tracks that include career development, learning technologies, global human resource development, learning measurement and analytics, human capital, management, instructional design, science of learning, leadership development, and training delivery industry tracks that include government, healthcare, higher education, and sales enablement simultaneous interpretation for several sessions in Japanese, Korean, and Mandarin Chinese.

    ATD 2017 offers the world's largest EXPO dedicated to the talent development field. More than 400 world class suppliers with the latest tools and resources will be on hand to share and showcase their expertise.

  • Cape Cod Times: Irish Tenor returns for concert of memories
    Cape Cod Times: Irish Tenor returns for concert of memories
    Mar 16, 2017
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    Cape Cod Times: Irish Tenor returns for concert of memories
    Mar 16, 2017

    It's been a few years since Ronan Tynan has sung on the Cape, but he's no stranger to the area.
    By Kay Keough Contributing Writer

    The sound of scraping silverware echoes on the other side of the phone as Ronan Tynan says hello. He's eating an avocado as we start our interview, in an effort "to try to gain back the figure I had 30 years ago."

    "Aren't we all?" I ask.

    He laughs and chats in his warm Irish brogue for a few minutes, making a friendly connection before we get down to business. For someone who's had as much success as he has had, the 56-year-old famed Irish tenor sounds very down-to-earth and genuinely excited to perform Sunday at Cape Cod Community College's Tilden Arts Center.

    It's been a few years since he's sung on the Cape, Tynan says, but he's no stranger to the area. He enjoys visiting and readily shares some memories of celebrating his 15th birthday on Nantucket, trying and failing to save the life of a man who was likely having a heart attack while driving near the Cape, and singing for the Kennedy family on Martha's Vineyard.

    If you don't know much about his life, strap in. Tynan is much more than a singer. His is kind of like a superhero origin story, minus the radioactive material.

    Tynan was born in Dublin, Ireland, with a lower limb disability. As a child growing up on a farm, he overcame his limitations and enjoyed riding horses and racing motorcycles. But at the age of 20, he faced another major challenge: a car accident that caused such serious complications, he had to have his legs amputated below the knee.

    Nevertheless, he quickly got back to his daily life and, within a year, started winning gold medals in the Paralympics – 18 of them, plus 14 world records (nine of which still stand) between 1981 and 1984.

    After becoming the first disabled person admitted to the National College of Physical Education, he went on to be a medical doctor, specializing in orthopedic sports injuries, with a degree from Trinity College in Dublin. It wasn't until the age of 33 that he took his first voice lesson, although he and his father often sung together as he was growing up.

    It is the support of his late parents, and the moral standing they gave him, to which Tynan attributes much of his success.

    "I don't have adjectives to describe how great my mother was." he says. "The person I am today really is a tribute to the person she made me into."

    Tynan wrote a song honoring his mother, whom he lost to Alzheimer's disease, called "Passing Through." Though he declines to choose a "favorite" song of his – because that would mean putting more attention on some over others – the song clearly means a great deal to him, as he talks of the difficulty he had editing down something so deeply personal.

    He describes his father, meanwhile, as a "dote of a man" who loved him unconditionally. "Everything I did, he would laud," he says. While his mother thought of Tynan's singing as an avocation, his father was his cheerleader.

    "When I was a junior and an intern in hospital, he used to say, 'you have to do something with the voice, Ro.'"

    Tynan won the BBC equivalent of "American Idol," called "Go For It," less than a year after studying voice at 33, and then the coveted John McCormack Cup for Tenor Voice. After the show, he was recruited as the first member of The Irish Tenors, the acclaimed trio known for numerous TV specials and performances of classical numbers at venues from Radio City Music Hall to the Sydney Opera House.

    Although he took a multi-year break from the group to chase a solo career, he balances both pursuits now and plans to soon release two new albums. In addition to his own concerts, he has several lined up with the Tenors, including a performance in Russia in September. That's a gig that gives him some consternation in the current political climate, but not quite enough to steer the conversation in that direction.

    While reflecting on his background, Tynan draws parallels between his work as a doctor and as a singer, noting that some of the best conductors in the world were doctors before they turned to music.

    "One minute, you're ministering to people with a physical ailment, and then you make the decision to perform in front of thousands and hope you affect them," he says.

    Tynan has displayed his ability to touch people with his vocal performances on stage. He is perhaps most widely known in the U.S. for his stirring renditions of "God Bless America" before major sporting events, his moving performance at the funeral of former President Ronald Reagan, and his consoling presence at the memorial for Sept. 11. Since coming to the U.S. 19 years ago, Tynan has become a go-to figure for both moments of sad reflection and joyous celebration.

    At his concert in West Barnstable, he promises "sincerity and truth in the sound," and "the privilege of being nostalgic" as his songs bring memories of people loved and lost.

    His set list as a solo artist is broader than when he performs with the Tenors, and on Sunday will likely include a Broadway showtune and a religious song. (As a Catholic, he also gives much credit for his ongoing success to his faith.)

    As he performs alongside pianist Bill Lewis, with whom he's worked for 17 years, Tynan just wants to provide comfort and connection to his devoted fans.

    "I always like the audience to feel I'm singing to them in their own living room, just for them," he says.

  • Broadway World: Acclaimed Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan Returns to Patchogue Theatre in April for One-Night Performance
    Broadway World: Acclaimed Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan Returns to Patchogue Theatre in April for One-Night Performance
    Mar 09, 2017
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    Broadway World: Acclaimed Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan Returns to Patchogue Theatre in April for One-Night Performance
    Mar 09, 2017

    Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts (PTPA) is honored to welcome back acclaimed Irish tenor, Ronan Tynan, in "An Evening with Ronan Tynan" on Saturday, April 1 at 8 p.m.

    Ronan Tynan moves people like few others can. His personal story of triumph and his impassioned singing captivates and inspires audiences nationwide. Called the "burly tenor with a big, silvery voice" by Variety, Tynan accompanied by his long time pianist Bill Lewis, will bring a repertoire that is diverse as it is entertaining: a mix of Irish favorites, selections from the great American songbook, contemporary, as well as newly written material. The New York Times recognizes Tynan's "unornamented singing as distinct relief, who lets the lines of familiar melodies soar without fancy embellishment."

    Introduced to American audiences in 1999 as a member of The Irish Tenors, Tynan continues to perform throughout the United States and record new material as a solo artist. In addition, he is currently the Alltech Visiting Artist in Residence at the University of Kentucky's Opera Theatre program teaching Vocal Performance and Voice and Repertoire classes with a focus in oratorio and opera at the undergraduate and graduate level.

    Tickets for "An Evening with Ronan Tynan" are available online, by phone or at the box office. Ticket prices range from $48 to $60 plus a ticket service fee. For more information on Ronan Tynan's one-night engagement at Patchogue Theatre, visit PatchogueTheatre.org or call the Box Office at 631-207-1313.

    If you are interested in booking Ronan Tynan for an event, please contact Executive Speakers Bureau at (901) 754-9404.


  • Cape Cod: Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan to Make Cape Cod Appearance
    Cape Cod: Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan to Make Cape Cod Appearance
    Feb 20, 2017
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    Cape Cod: Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan to Make Cape Cod Appearance
    Feb 20, 2017

    WEST BARNSTABLE – Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan will be performing at the Tilden Arts Center at Cape Cod Community College next month.

    Introduced to international audiences as a member of the Irish Tenors, Tynan quickly became known for his unique voice and irresistible appeal.

    Following his mother’s advice to always follow your dreams, Tynan decided to launch a solo career and has achieved the fame and adoration that could have existed only in the farthest reaches of his dreams.

    Tynan will perform songs from his rich repertoire of Irish folksongs and American classics.

    Tickets for the March 19 show are $39-59 and are on sale now at capecodshows.com.

    Ronan is known as a modern day “renaissance man” and has faced a number of challenges throughout his well-documented life.

    In the spring of 2005, Ronan released his self-titled debut album, which began a new era in his career.

    Ronan debuted number two on Billboard’s Classical Crossover Chart, just behind Josh Groban, and was the eighth best-selling classical crossover album of 2005.

    It also reached number two on the World Album Chart and peaked at number nine on the Contemporary Christian Chart.

    For more information on ESB exclusive speaker Ronan Tynan, call Executive Speakers Bureau at (901) 754-9404.

  • Ronan Tynan Concert – Internationally Acclaimed Irish Tenor
    Ronan Tynan Concert – Internationally Acclaimed Irish Tenor
    Jan 09, 2017
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    Ronan Tynan Concert – Internationally Acclaimed Irish Tenor
    Jan 09, 2017

    On February 12, 2017 at 2:00pm, Assumption Church and Academy will be hosting Ronan at Receptions Conference Center. Willis Music Florence is proud to be a sponsor! For more information, call Linda Gray at 859-485-3800 ext 0 or 631-813-8597

    Ronan Tynan is truly a modern day “Renaissance Man.” Faced with numerous challenges throughout his well documented life, he has persevered with enormous passion and determination. He attributes his success to his faith and the knowledge that the Man Above guides him through every door he opens. Introduced to international audiences as a member of the Irish Tenors, Tynan quickly became known for his unique voice and irresistible appeal. Following his mother’s advice to always follow your dreams, Tynan decided to launch a solo career, and has achieved the fame and adoration that could have existed only in the farthest reaches of his dreams.

    Tynan’s singing offered the gentlest consolation at the funeral of President Ronald Reagan in the summer of 2004, when an international TV audience of more than 35 million heard him sing “Amazing Grace” and Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” at the personal invitation of Nancy Reagan. Ronan is also famous for his performances of “God Bless America” at Yankee Stadium during the seventh-inning stretch, which he says have been nothing short of unforgettable. In 2006 he started an affiliation with the Buffalo Sabres hockey team and has performed “God Bless America” at many of their games.

    Ronan’s ability to simultaneously console and inspire is well-documented. In the wake of 9/11, the men and women of the New York Police Department and New York Fire Department and their families have been able to count on Ronan Tynan’s abiding concern and beautiful voice. Ronan has performed at benefits and memorial services for New York’s Finest and Bravest, and his singing softened the sorrow of many in the wake of the tragedy.

    Of course, there have been plenty of joyous moments in Ronan’s career as well. In the spring of 2004, the Belmont Stakes got off to a rollicking start when Tynan—a passionate horseman himself—christened the race with a ringing rendition of “New York, New York.” This is of particular interest marking the first time ever in Belmont’s 30-year history that a singer was invited to perform live as they traditionally play the version recorded by Frank Sinatra. Tynan has performed for countless dignitaries worldwide including the wedding of New York’s former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani to Judith Nathan on the grounds of Gracie Mansion. His voice also brightened the 80th birthday celebration of former President George H.W. Bush in the summer of 2004 in Houston.

    In the spring of 2005, Ronan released his self-titled debut album, which began a new era in his career. “I think it shows a greater versatility than any other album I’ve done,” Tynan has said. “I wanted to sing a greater variety of music and spread my wings a bit, make a move out of the classic ‘Irish tenor’ vein.” The album contains the heartfelt “Passing Through,” which honors Ronan’s mother, whose vibrant spirit has been taken away by the long night of Alzheimer’s disease. Ronan debuted #2 on Billboard’s Classical Crossover Chart, just behind Josh Groban, and was the 8th best-selling classical crossover album of 2005. It also reached #2 on the World Album Chart and peaked at #9 on the Contemporary Christian Chart. His career has also been well-documented with appearances on Primetime Live, Good Morning America, the Hour of Power, 700 Club, Fox & Friends and many other high-profile television shows.

    Ronan sang at the White House Governors’ Ball at the invitation of President and Mrs. Bush in February, 2007, and in 2008 returned to the White House to sing at the St. Patrick’s Day Reception attended by members of the U.S. and Irish governments. He performed during the Concert of Hope prior to the Papal Mass at Yankee Stadium in April, 2008. He is currently in the recording stages of two upcoming CD releases, one an all-Irish CD, and a second collection of songs performed at his concerts and requested by fans throughout the world. In 2007 due to popular demand, he released a DVD of his motivational speech: Hitting the High Notes, Living Life to the Fullest.

    Tynan in Paralympics

    Though Ronan enjoyed singing as a boy, he did not seriously consider formal voice study until he was 33, when he was well into his residency as a physician. His quick success is a typical development in a life of extraordinary achievement. Born with lower limb disability that threatened to sideline him throughout his childhood, Tynan was still “as wild as a March hare” when he was a growing boy, riding horses and racing motorcycles. When he was twenty, his legs had to be amputated below the knee after an auto accident caused serious complications. Just weeks after the operation, he was climbing up the steps of his college dorm, and within a year, he was winning gold medals in the Paralympics as a multitalented athlete. Between 1981 and 1984, Tynan amassed eighteen gold medals and fourteen world records of which he still holds nine.

    The determination instilled in Ronan by his parents, a diminutive couple with gigantic ambitions for their son, soon propelled him to conquer a whole new field. Tynan became the first disabled person ever admitted to the National College of Physical Education. He later became a full-fledged medical doctor, specializing in orthopedic sports injuries, with a degree from prestigious Trinity College.

    Ronan won both the John McCormack Cup for Tenor Voice and the BBC talent show Go For It less than one year after beginning the study of voice. The following year, he won the International Operatic Singing

    Competition in Maumarde, France. He made his operatic debut as Pinkerton in Puccini’s Madame Butterfly, and cut his teeth on the concert repertoire in performances of Verdi’s Requiem, Mendelssohn’sElijah, Handel’s Messiah, Rossini’s Stabat Mater, and Puccini’s Messa di Gloria. In 1998, Tynan joined Anthony Kearns and John McDermott (later Finbar Wright) as The Irish Tenors, an instant worldwide sensation. His autobiography Halfway Home was published in February of 2002.

    R Tynan 2012 Patriots Playoff Game

    Ronan is one of the most sought after motivational speakers in the U.S., presenting nearly 50 speeches annually for major international corporations and organizations.

    The big Irishman has a special relationship with American audiences now. “America is powerful and intense, and it begs you to take it on,” Tynan marvels. “If you do that and do it right, it will give you absolutely everything you want. The thing I love about America is that there are so many people who want you to do well. They will you to do well. They encourage you, and they rejoice in your success. That’s a great virtue. I think Americans are fantastic people, amazing,” he says. And while Tynan claims that America has given him so much more than he’ll ever be able to give back, those who have attended his concerts, basking in the stirring beauty of his music and rolling with laughter at his self-effacing humor, may well just have to disagree.

  • Ronan Tynan Speaks For Youth Villages
    Ronan Tynan Speaks For Youth Villages
    Nov 20, 2015

    On Nov. 18, Paralympian, speaker and M.D. Ronan Tynan gave a keynote at this year's Youth Villages Employee Conference. Ronan is an exclusive speaker of ours who has an incredibly motivating story to share.

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    Ronan Tynan Speaks For Youth Villages
    Nov 20, 2015
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    Earlier this week, our exclusive speaker Ronan Tynan gave a keynote at the Youth Villages Employee Conference held in Memphis, Tennessee.

    Youth Villages is a private nonprofit organization whose mission is to help troubled youth, both emotionally and behaviorally troubled, and their families live successfully. Youth Villages is in 20 different states and Washington D.C. where they help more than 23,000 children and families yearly. 

    After being honored with standing ovation, it was evident that Ronan had moved and inspired the room of 1,200 people with his story.

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